Saturday, September 20, 2008

Apologetics: Explaining Christianity to a Muslim

For the past week or so, I've been engaged with an essentially one-way dialogue with a Muslim on the blog of Lillian, a recent convert to Catholicism. Jacknaim has been asking questions about images of Jesus, whether Jesus is God, what it means for Jesus to be at the right hand of the Father, Scriptural support for the Trinity, and a host of others (why are some bibles different from others, why aren't the gospels the first New Testament literature, what about the "Gospel of Barnabas", is the resurrection of flesh or spirit, and why would God use Greek phrases like "Alpha and "Omega").

It's a bit exhausting! Prayer would be greatly appreciated.

5 comments:

Weekend Fisher said...

You've got my prayers. Also, I have taken part in a few such interchanges also; if there's any way I can be helpful please let me know.

Take care & God bless
Anne / WF

Gretchen said...

Praying here. God will send someone to hold your arms up (Moses, you know).

I Love JEsus said...

So, how's the result. Did he convinced to Christianity

japhy said...

No. He remains convinced that our Scriptures are corrupted (like Matthew 28:18-20 being a late addition and not really the words of Christ) and that our belief in God as a Trinity of Persons is based on a poor reading of corrupted texts.

I've ended my conversation with him because I do not think I will be the one to convince him. So long as he is convinced that any argument I give from Scripture is based on corrupted Scriptures, I am at a severe disadvantage.

Weekend Fisher said...

If it's any help, the usual line with that is to ask when Scriptures were corrupted -- since Mohammed referred highly to the Scriptures in his day, and the texts we use for Scriptures are older than that, there's a pretty easy answer to that objection. Not that that obligates you to beat your head against a wall if that's the kind of guy he is, just so you know the usual way through that objection.

Take care & God bless
Anne / WF