Sunday, August 30, 2009

BOOK: Praying the Mass: The Prayers of the People

(Updated on August 31st)

(Reminder: check out the USCCB Committee for Divine Worship web page for Missal Formation on a regular basis)

I wrote a book (hopefully the first volume of a set) about the new English translation of the Mass to be used starting in Advent of 2010 or 2011. The book is called Praying the Mass: The Prayers of the People. I'm self-printing and self-publishing it through CreateSpace.com.  It will be available for purchase ($12) in the middle of September 2009.

You can find out more information, and buy the book, at the book's official promotional web site, PrayingTheMass.com.

Copyright Permissions
I have received copyright permissons from the International Committee on English in the Liturgy (ICEL) for the English text of the Mass!  After meeting with Fr. Peter Stravinskas recently, I learned that my book does not need approval from the CDWDS in Rome to use the Latin texts (for the same reason it didn't need ecclesiastical approval from my diocese).

Diocesan Approval
I have sent a copy to my diocesan office to apply for a nihil obstat and an imprimatur. On August 3rd I heard back from the diocese: Reverend Monsignor William Benwell, JCL (the Vicar General of the diocese) has determined that ecclesiastical approval for my book is not necessary.

Foreword
My brother, Fr. Charlie (ordained 17 years!), has completed his foreword. I am very pleased with it, and I thank him profoundly for it. You can read the whole thing here:
It is with great pleasure and fraternal pride that I welcome you to this immensely useful and inspiring work. Great pleasure – because I am sure that those who read it will be edified in their approach to participating at Mass. Fraternal pride – because the author is my younger brother and godson!

In 1992, at my Mass of Thanksgiving the day following my ordination to the priesthood, altar server Jeffrey helped lead the way as the crucifer. Now it is my turn to lead the way into a great work of faith on his part.

Praying the Mass is a helpful and accessible volume for anyone who would like to enter more deeply into the experience of the Eucharistic liturgy. And it is especially useful because of the pending implementation of the new translation of the Roman Missal.

Jeffrey skillfully weaves together theology, history and spirituality to explain why we pray, how we pray and what we pray at Mass. While this book is written primarily to guide lay people, I expect that priests and deacons will also find much to nourish their own prayerful participation at Mass as well.

In his 2009 homily on the Solemnity of Corpus Christi, Pope Benedict warned of the risk of “a formal and empty Eucharistic worship, in celebrations lacking this participation from the heart that is expressed in veneration and respect for the liturgy.” This book contributes to the movement to stir “participation from the heart” and is most timely indeed.

Rev. Charles Pinyan
Solemnity of the Most Holy Body and Blood of Christ, 2009
Thanks!
Thank you to all who helped read and review my book.  And I am especially grateful to those who prayed for this project of mine.  I hope it will be of great benefit to all English-speaking Catholics around the world.

I have begun research for the second volume, The Prayers of the Priest.

5 comments:

Weekend Fisher said...

Many blessings to you for these prayers and through prayer.

Take care & God bless
Anne / WF

Tiber Jumper said...

Congrats Jeff!
Let me know when it's out and I will buy a copy!
God bless you

Scelata said...

Very good news indeed, this sounds as if it will be a very useful little volume.
I enjoyed the bit of it that I read via another blog.
Prayers and the very best wishes for its success.

(Save the Liturgy, Save the World)

Anonymous said...

Congrats!

Did you send a letter with your book to the CDW about the Diocese of Rochester dialogue homily issue? This problem is still going on in many parishes, and its becoming incredibly frustrating to attend Mass anymore.

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